The Best Snowboard Bindings

Our favorite snowboard binding is the Now O-Drive. This binding’s unique design takes some cues from a skateboard truck, and pivots on a kingpin to deliver pressure only on the outside edge. It ranks 10-out-of-10 on stiffness and offers precise control of your board. However, it is expensive. If you want something more affordable, we also like the solid all-around performance of the Union Pro.

We put snowboard bindings to the test over the 2016-2017 winter by riding at premier resorts around the west: Jackson Hole, Wyoming and Mammoth Mountain, California. We also took these for some trial side country runs to get a feel for performance beyond lift-serviced terrain.

Review Year
Best in Class
Overall Rating
Price
Name Overall Rating Ratings The Good The Bad Price
Now O-Drive Binding
96
Best in Class
2017
Durability 9
Performance 10
Build Quality 10
Weight/Performance 10
Comfort 9
Ease of Use 8

Lightweight

Very responsive

Great ankle straps adjustability

Very durable bindings

Bushing choice provide different ride qualities

The price

Carbon fiber shows wear

MSRP
$499.00
BEST DEAL
$423.93
Union Contact Pro Binding
92
Durability 8
Performance 9
Build Quality 9
Weight/Performance 9
Comfort 9
Ease of Use 8

Affordable

Solid track record

Fun selection of colorways

Premature wear on footbed

Time-consuming base plate set-up

MSRP
$259.95
BEST DEAL
$220.96
Ride Rodeo Binding
86
Durability 7
Performance 9
Build Quality 7
Weight/Performance 8
Comfort 8
Ease of Use 7

Lightweight materials

Canted footbeds

Microdisc doesn’t interfere with flex pattern

Webbing on toe strap is unproven

Replacement parts hard to find

MSRP
$269.95
BEST DEAL
$249.95
K2 Hurrithane Binding
84
Durability 6
Performance 8
Build Quality 6
Weight/Performance 7
Comfort 8
Ease of Use 9

Affordable

Fewer parts—less to lose/break

Easy entry

Meager toe binding strap

Replacement parts hard to find

MSRP
$219.95
BEST DEAL
$139.97
evo
Now O-Drive Binding

There’s no other binding design like Now’s on the market: taking inspiration from a skateboard truck, the binding pivots on a kingpin to deliver pressure only to the outside edge. On the snow the kingpin helps deliver more power to edges and provides quicker response. Although it’s the best binding we tested, it’s also the most expensive.

Read the Full Review Shop Now at REI.com

Union Contact Pro Binding

The Union Contact Pro is an affordable, lightweight, high-performance binding. You know that old saw about gear: “Do you want it cheap, light, or good? Choose two.” This binding goes three for three. The drawbacks were minimal—the footbed showed wear earlier than some and set-up took a couple of extra minutes. 

Read the Full Review Shop Now at Backcountry.com

Ride Rodeo Binding

The Ride Rodeo is for the all mountain freestyle rider who wants more flexible bindings and some signature style when it comes to aesthetics. The canted footbeds provided more comfort and better performance—more pop—than similar bindings. Although we liked the Spidey-like look of the webbing on the toe strap, we question its long term durability.  

Read the Full Review Shop Now at SummitSports.com

See All Snowboard Bindings Reviews

Find the Best Snowboard Bindings for you

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Bindings are what connect you to your board, transferring your power into the motions that your board makes. This means that your snowboard bindings should complement your riding skills and style. As with snowboard boots, the main differences in the ability and style of your bindings are found in the flex. The flex of your snowboard bindings should roughly match the flex of your boots. So if you ride stiff boots, look for tall, stiff highbacks on your binding. Stiff and tall bindings are usually chosen by experts and boarders who want to ride powder and big mountain lines. Beginner riders typically prefer a softer flex and lower highbacks. This is also the favored setup for freestyle riders who like the extra flexibility when landing jumps and tricks.

Make sure your binding is compatible with your board. Almost all snowboards come with 2×4 or 4×4 bolt patterns, but some brands have specialized configurations. For example, Burton has 3D and Channel systems that only work with Burton boards and Burton bindings. If you choose a 2×4 or 4×4 bolt patterned board, it gives you a little more freedom to mix and match brands to achieve a personalized, perfect setup for you.