NEMO Losi LS 2P Review

May 14, 2015
NEMO Losi LS 2P
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GEAR INSTITUTE RATINGS
85
Shoulder Room
9
Packability
7
Set Up
6
Weatherproof
9
Features
7
Value
7

The Good

  • Big vestibule and generous shoulder room
  • Handy compartmentalized packing sleeve
  • Solid three season durability

The Bad

  • No vents
  • Bigger pockets would be nice
THE VERDICT

A relatively light tent with a whole lot of livable space, the NEMO Losi LS 2P is a great option if you plan on spending a lot of time inside your tent.

FULL REVIEW

Shoulder Room

The NEMO Losi LS 2P is bigger than most in this category, in almost all directions: 55 inches wide, 45 inches high, and 22 square feet of combined space in the two vestibules. At 86 inches long, it’s a little shorter than some two person tents, but only a basketball player would notice the two inch difference. Bends in the poles help pull the body of the tent vertically, creating generous elbow room.

Packability

NEMO makes it easy and almost enjoyable to pack up this tent. Rather than cramming the body and fly into a stuff sack, NEMO ships the tent, poles, and pegs in a handy bag that separates each into its own compartment. Unroll it and everything is neatly laid out in its individual slot. This system really comes in handy when packing up: Simply fold both fly and tent into a small square and slip into the big pocket, collapse poles into their sleeve, toss everything else into the last compartment, roll it up like a burrito, fasten the webbing straps, and you’re done. Way less wrestling, messing and fussing. The pole sections are a little longer than usual, but the whole thing packs fairly small, 22 by 8 inches. The only drawback to this system is that it’s near impossible to break it apart for shared carrying, but at 4.5 pounds, that’s not such a big deal. 

Set Up

While the tangle of poles looks intimidating, it is actually pretty straight forward. A double pole connected at an apex hub props the tent up and two side poles pull the sides closer to vertical. The symmetrical design is easy to figure out and fast to set up. We’ve found people love or hate the Jake’s feet style pole attachment system—a ball on the end of the poles clips into a binding socket on each corner. It’s a secure system, but can be annoying in sand and hard to pop out with cold hands.

Weatherproof

The dome shape and to-the-ground fly easily sheds water off and away from the tent. Even in a nightlong downpour we noticed no pooling. At the head and feet, a waterproof vertical wall locks out any precipitation and wind. The vestibule doors stop short of the edge of the tent, so drips off the fly land just clear of the inside of the tent. The bathtub style floor is seam free. All in all, solid three season performance. 

Features

Fit for its roomy design this tent has a lot of features: Four small pockets are handily placed low and high around the doors, and the compartmentalized packing system. One problem: lack of vents. There are none in the fly, and the vestibule zip is one way, so it can’t be cracked at the top to improve air flow.

Value

At $400, this tent is on the upper end of the price spectrum, especially for its middle weight. But with many solid features, a long season of use, and plenty of room, this tent is overall a pretty good value.  

 


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WHERE TO BUY
MSRP
$390.00
ALSO AVAILABLE AT
$389.95
$299.95
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