Chaco Tedinho Waterproof Boot Review

March 15, 2013
Chaco Tedinho Waterproof Boot
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GEAR INSTITUTE RATINGS
68
Support & Stability
2
Quality & Construction
8
Comfort
6
Weight
2
Protection
8
Value
2

The Good

  • Attractive full-grain leather upper
  • Luxurious “Luvseat” footbed
  • 25-percent recycled rubber sole

The Bad

  • Stiff cuff irritated my ankle
  • Flexible sole left my feet achy
  • Lack of support relegates this boot to groomed paths
THE VERDICT

The Tedinho is like my mom—she likes the idea of adventure, but has neither the inclination nor the technical ability to explore the backcountry. This boot performs at its best on light, mellow, on-trail walks in damp or cool weather. It also makes for a great all-purpose travel shoe due to its elegant look and ability to handle modest terrain in varying weather conditions.

ITEM DESCRIPTION

What it is: The Tedinho is a full grain leather boot with a waterproof membrane and low-profile, 25-percent recylcled rubber outsole built for mellow on-trail day hikes.

FULL REVIEW

Support & Stability
I wouldn’t bring the Tedinho on a long treks or hikes with the chance of unpredictable terrain due to its poor support and stability. The lack of torsional rigidity (I can actually “wring” the shoe like a towel) makes for some sloshing around and ankle rolling on uneven ground. The lack of a stabilizing shank also forced my foot to bend quite a bit, causing premature fatigue.

Comfort
Chaco’s “Luvseat” footbed is a major plus for this boot. On even, flat trails my feet felt well-cushioned. When I started climbing some unstable, rocky hills, however, the lack of cushioning in the cuff really took a toll on my ankles.

Quality and Construction
The Tedinho is a very well-made boot. Full-grain leather uppers are unusual for light hikers, probably because: 1) they’re expensive, and 2) leather doesn’t breathe as well as mesh and synthetics. The upshot to full-grain leather is its supreme durability (if taken care of properly), natural water resistance, and handsome appearance.

Note on Durability Rating
Because we rarely have enough time in a field test to actually wear out a boot, durability is determined by the materials used (ex: full-grain leather lasts longer than mesh); features such as rubber toe and heel caps; and whether or not the upper is constructed out of one piece of leather, or multiple pieces and materials sewn together. Our ratings are based on general wisdom and we cannot guarantee that a boot with a higher durability rating will actually outlast those with lower ratings.

Value
The Tedinho’s pricepoint is above average in this test. At $150, you’re spending quite a bit on style but not getting much in the way of function if you’re looking for a supportive, competent light hiker. We had to ding this boot on value.

 


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WHERE TO BUY
MSRP
$150.00
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