Big Agnes Lost Ranger Review

June 4, 2015
Big Agnes Lost Ranger
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Big Agnes Lost Ranger 2-bigagnes-lost-ranger_2 3-bigagnes-lost-ranger_3
GEAR INSTITUTE RATINGS
80
Compressibility
5
Warmth to Weight Ratio
5
Comfort
9
Durability
8
Features
6
Value
7

The Good

  • Comfortable fit
  • Durable shell
  • Good for active sleepers

The Bad

  • Heavy
  • Not as warm as rating suggests
  • Bulky
THE VERDICT

The Big Agnes Lost Ranger offers a load of interior space, making it ideal for active sleepers. I loved the ability to change my sleeping positions throughout the night, but other testers felt the bag was overly roomy, providing lots of dead space that can trap cold air. That may be why the Lost Ranger, despite its 15º rating, failed to keep testers warm and comfortable in temperatures that dipped into the mid-20s.

FULL REVIEW

Compressibility
Though the Lost Ranger sports DownTek insulation, its compressibility felt more on par with synthetic bags. The 650-fill down partially explains that, but the stout ripstop nylon shell and its durable water repellent (DWR) finish further explains the bag’s 8-inch by 18-inch stuff size.  

Warmth
The Lost Ranger feels lofty and cozy, but I found it a bit cooler than its 15º rating suggests. After several nights in sub-freezing temperatures, I felt the Lost Ranger was comfortable in temperatures above 25 or so. The generous cut and loose-fitting hood largely accounts for that discrepancy. Large voids in the bag sucked warmth away from me, while the broad hood allowed cold air infiltration—this was especially noticeable with active sleepers like me, though even one-position sleepers among our testers found the bag a bit chilly in cold conditions. 

Features
The hood, while comfortable, was a bit too broad to cinch comfortably and securely around my face. That meant cold-air leaked in and chilled my torso. The vertically positioned baffles (that is, the down ‘tubes’ ran the length of my body instead of across it in traditional bag configuration) didn’t seem to impact the bag’s performance. 

A DWR finish on the bag’s outer shell enhances the water repellency of the DownTek, making this an outstanding bag in wet or humid conditions. 

The Lost Ranger’s most appreciated feature was the integrated sleeping pad sleeve that helps ensure the bag (and its occupant) remained centered on the sleeping pad.

Overall Comfort
Comfort is subjective, but all four testers—including side-sleepers, back-sleepers and active-sleepers—who used the Lost Ranger dubbed it a supremely comfortable bag. The broad cut from shoulders to feet allows plenty of room to move, stretch, and adjust throughout the night. The one knock on comfort was the hood. Everyone felt it was too generous—we couldn’t find a way to comfortably cinch it snug enough to seal out air drafts. 

Durability
The ripstop nylon shell of the Lost Ranger features a DWR finish that not only helps fight off moisture but creates a slick outer face that helps the nylon slide off objects that might otherwise snag the bag. While testing, I slept out under the stars in a coulee in the upper Columbia River Basin and despite frequent contact with abrasive basalt rocks, tough sagebrush branches, and even a couple hedgehog cacti, the bag’s outer shell didn’t tear.

Unfortunately, the zipper did frequently catch on the bag’s inner liner and a few small tears developed there. That gave us cause for concern about the bag’s long-term durability.

Value
The combination of DownTek and a DWR shell make the Lost Ranger a great option for wet climates. The biggest knock on the bag is its weight and pack size, but the modest price and generous fit make it suitable for comfort-seeking hikers.

 


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MSRP
$279.00
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