Banking on 45 years of experience making goggles in the United States, the new Scott Prospect DH/Enduro/Freeride goggle explores the limits for field of vision and lens retention, tested by some of the most progressive riders in the world. Watch how these and other goggles are made in Utah through this amazing video.

It’s the extra lens height in the Prospect that gives riders maximum field of vision. And they feature the Scott lens lock system, featuring four locking pins that go through the lens, and the brand says that no matter the impact, it guarantees that the lens is not popping out. In addition, a thicker lens material (1mm) is used to make the lens even more resistant than before. An extra wide, no-slip silicone strap together with articulated outriggers contribute to the improvement of the helmet integration.

Scott Prospect Goggle

For changing the lens, simply open the four tabs (2 at the top, 2 at the bottom) to remove the lens from the frame. Scott says this should only take a couple of seconds.

Thermoformed face foam is “optimized” for the Prospect to offer comfort and sweat management while improving overall fit. The new closed cell foam is now softer and has been designed to sit lower on the cheeks offering even pressure spread.

“This goggle and the associated large width Works Film System have been in specific development for three years,” said Ken Barfield, President of DFG, the wholly owned goggle-making subsidiary ofScott Sports in Ogden, UT. “The goggles are produced in the Scott goggle manufacturing facility in Ogden, Utah by DFG. We are, along with Smith Optics, one of two U.S. goggle manufacturing plants and the only producer today of motocross goggles in the U.S.” DFG began goggle manufacturing in 1977 and has been producing Scott goggles since the summer of 1981.

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