Mammut Trion Guide 35+7 Review

September 26, 2014
Mammut Trion Guide 35+7
Trion_Guide_Stock_Image_Back
Mammut Trion Guide 35+7 Trion_Guide_Stock_Image_Back
GEAR INSTITUTE RATINGS
90
Comfort & Adjustability
8
Weight
6
Capacity
10
Organization & Access
8
Features
8

The Good

  • Capable of carrying huge weight comfortably
  • Easily strippable
  • Good access and organization for a climbing pack
  • Overbuilt and durable

The Bad

  • Specialized features noticeably increased weight
  • Dark, low visibility interior
THE VERDICT

As is typical of most outdoor gear that includes “Guide” as part of its model name, the Mammut Trion Guide 35+7 intentionally packs on some extra weight in the name of improved durability, versatility and long-day comfort. Some of those features come as removal accessories, so the pack’s weight can be trimmed a bit at times, but the Trion Guide is still heavier than most packs we tested. The Trion Guide served as a solid bag for winter day trips or summertime overnight alpine excursions.

ITEM DESCRIPTION

The Mammut Trion Guide 35+7 is a mountaineering-inspired backpack featuring dedicated attachments for skis, ice tools, and crampons.

FULL REVIEW

Comfort/Adjustability
Designed for use over layered jackets, the Trion’s padding may feel stiff to those using it in not-so-wintery conditions. That said, its combination of a robust frame and full-coverage hip-belt made it considerably more comfortable under heavy loads than most light-duty daypacks of similar capacity.

Weight
Especially considering its alpine predilections, I felt that the Trion Guide’s stated weight was a bit hefty for its performance. To be fair, this is “packaged weight” that includes both fixed and removable accessories, and I was able to cut significant ounces on most trips by leaving superfluous pieces at home.

Capacity
The Trion Guide is not a daypack in this category. It is fully capable of managing compact multi-day loads when expanded, and didn’t even flinch when I crammed it with nearly 40 pounds of necessary junk for a three-day Sierra climbing trip. Next time I’ll bring the tent as well since I am confident that this Mammut load-monster won’t mind.

Organization/Access
While this pack sports some nice organizational luxuries—zippered panel access as well as a large and useful front crampon pocket—I would have traded either for a light-colored interior. Extra access points don’t help much when the inside of your bag is a black hole.

Features
The Trion Guide bristles with functional extras, ready to easily carry skis, rope, ice tools, crampons, and other gear. Even better, some of these little conveniences are simple to remove if they’re unnecessary for a specific objective. My one gripe here was with the unfortunately fixed Velcro axe-keepers: Replaceable shock-cord loops would have been much nicer.

Value
The high asking price of the Mammut Trion Guide 35+7 was balanced by high marks for durability, versatility, and overall awesomeness. Though it seems a bit expensive, it packs enough performance to make it a solid value for those carrying heavy metal in the mountains.

 

 


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WHERE TO BUY
MSRP
$190.00
ALSO AVAILABLE AT
$179.95
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